Book Review: Palestine: Peace not Apartheid

by Jimmy Carter
2006, Simon and Schuster, 250 pages
The Israeli garrison state continues to cough up humanitarian fur balls

CarterEditor’s note: This is sixth time (previous: 1/12/18) I’ve reposted the original review.

Editor’s note: I’m replaying this book review from the old version of my site because of its timeliness and what I have learned very recently about political Zionism and the state of Israel,[1] especially regarding false flag operations and crimes against humanity[2][3]… which it certainly would appear are happening, as we speak, in the Gaza Strip. My goodness, this book was written 12 years ago! Time flies. I remember how the so-called Israel Lobby raked ol’ president Jimmy over the coals for this mild-mannered, modest expose, as if he were pushing for rekindling the Nazi death camps. Au contraire, as it turns out, Mr. Carter was simply shedding light on the ongoing programs of war and ethnic cleansing—Carter never refers to it as such—by the ‘Israel Mob.’ Valuable work.

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My review as written, April 2007

If I had to use a single phrase to identify the main thrust of this timely, richly humanitarian book, it would be a message to the Israeli government: tyranny in Palestine ill befits you… and tyranny in Palestine is arguably the largest impediment to peace on the planet today.

Carter’s benevolent yet insistent message is the Israeli government must step up and live up to agreements it has made over the previous 60 years:

  • UN Resolution 194 (1949)—following an Arab-Israeli conflict when the Israelis declare independence, this measure says properties must be returned to any owners who agree to live in peace; Israel takes over 77% (!) of the land formerly considered Palestine.
  • UN Resolution 242 (1967)—calling for withdrawal from the occupied territories (Gaza, The West Bank, the Golan Heights, and areas around Jerusalem), a restoration of properties, compensation for victims, and secure 1949 borders for Israel.
  • UN Resolution 338 (1973)—confirms Resolution 242, calls for international peace talks, and various disengagement agreements.
  • The Camp David Accords (1978)—Israel and Egypt treaty, confirms UN Resolution 242, withdrawal of political and military forces from the West Bank and Gaza, and full autonomy for the Palestinians.
  • The Oslo Agreement (1993)—Israel and the PLO conclude an agreement and a five-year plan to resolve all remaining differences; UN Resolution 242 reconfirmed.

Then several other follow-ons, including:

  • Arab League Summit (2002)
  • Quartet Group (US, UN, EU, and Russia) “road map for peace” and the Geneva Initiative (2003)
  • UN Resolution 1701 (2006)

The latter was a desperate measure for a cease-fire following the recent Israeli invasion and bombing of Lebanon (and Gaza).

After reading the book, you’ll realize that, however you slice and dice the peace process, 242 and 338 still apply and the Israeli government simply defies them.  In essence, the state of Israel has decided to keep the land it has taken and to crush its rightful owners under the yoke of utter despotism.

That’s a fack, Jack.

Maybe it’s not genocide, but it walks and talks like genocide. Like the Bush dynasty, the Israeli fiefdom denies due process, secretly confines people indefinitely, practices torture, confiscates property, and deports people routinely—and that’s on a good day.

During its messianic 20th-century incursion, the state of Israel has expropriated hundreds of villages and displaced hundreds of thousands of Palestinians from their farms, homes, and businesses. I had no idea of the devastation. And now the Israeli totalitarian class has nearly completed this hideous West Bank Wall imprisoning everyone!

Where is the outcry?!  In Europe, I guess.

Jimmy’s book is igniting a firestorm of outrage from, of all places, the Israeli-tyranny lobby and its supporters.  They say the simple prose of our Nobel-Prize-winning, peanut-farmer, human-habitat-building president “supports terrorism.”  Yeah, right.  Where have we heard that before.

Jimmy Carter heroically speaks truth to power.

Fortunately, there’s an active peace and freedom movement in Israel, in the occupied territories, and around the world… just as there are substantial majorities everywhere for getting the US imperial corporatist juggernaut out of the Middle East domination/occupation business. Prospects are good for remediation of these superstate crimes.

[1] Against Our Better Judgment: How the US was used to create Israel, by Alison Weir
[2] Solving 911: The deception that changed the world, by Christopher Bollyn
[3] Movie Review: Losing the Liberty (June 8, 1967), by Brian Wright

SunFLOWerPalestine is an important book. In addition to the straightforward narrative, President Carter provides a clear understanding of relevant history.  He also gives you a glimpse of the connection between the Israeli government’s criminal enterprise and the international corporate, US-government-dominated criminal enterprise (the Cartel).

Priceless.

What do you think?


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2 thoughts on “Book Review: Palestine: Peace not Apartheid

  1. Agreed, Lloyd, as to the rise of Jimmy. What I think happened with the writing of this book, however, is he had a pang of conscience, enough to offer some sane resistance to the Greater Israel Project (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LM2Fi1rhYqc) and that route to ONE WORLD GOVERNMENT (via deep state Zionist global domination)… in which the Saudi rulers figure prominently. All in all, Jimmy’s prescriptions are a practical contextual solution.

  2. What nonsense Brian. The filthy, disgusting Jimmy Carter was purchased lock stock and barrel by Saudi money via contributions to his Presidential Library. “Jimmy” was installed by David Rockefeller’s Trilateral Commission in the Presidency. The Rockefellers, in alliance with the Saudis re: oil since WWII, have decided that Islamic tyranny is the practical path to ONE WORLD GOVERNMENT. Western Civilization had its chance but proved inadequately repressive for the requirements of World Government.

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