Brian’s Column: What Would Jesus Do, How Would Jesus Be?

Thoughts on an Aspect of Spiritual Consciousness
By Brian R. Wright

It’s Sunday morning, and I’ve awakened after a decent sleep. Immediately, my mind turns to the despair conveyed to me from a good friend and 9/11 Truth and Justice ally, Rudy. Via email he has brought to my attention Robert David Steele’s amazing and powerful, united-front Citizens’ Intelligence Briefing on 9/11 Truth for the President. [And earlier in the week I brought to his attention the hugely popular appealing video that has received more than three million views: Anatomy of a Great Deception, by David Hooper.]

Me: “Why the despair, Rudy? This is fabulous news. On two fronts.”

Rudy: “Sorry to be so cynical, but…No matter what we say and what authority we claim, nobody will listen. Has anything about this brief appeared anywhere other than in notifications from ae911truth.org? We live in a bicameral society. America is the greatest. America is the freest. Etc.” Then, Rudy ricochets toward the end as negative as I’ve ever seen him.

Countering the ‘depressive funk’ is why my mind turns to the Rudy matter… and to my own sense of just being ‘overwhelmed by circumstances…’ and the ‘what I need to do RIGHT NOW OR ALL IS LOST’ syndrome. When one is in such ‘compulsive-mind-mode’—ref. Eckhart Tolle—so to speak, then every little perturbation of what Buddha calls “the 10,000 things” has the potential to rattle one vigorously one way or the other. Like the tail wagging a dog into fine dust.

The immediate thought I had in the half-sleep before rising was that we’ve reached a point in our research of key truths, where all we need to do is state them calmly and matter of factly, as Jesus would do… and it’s icing on the cake if we can muster a parable or two from our Sunday School lore. In other words, Rudy and myself and so many others have gotten into the habit-oft-addiction of letting our minds trick us into this illusory dragon-slaying mode. We need a change. Continue reading

Brian’s Column: The ‘Love’ Catalyst

Could ‘love’ projection be the Missing Link for the (good) cause-oriented?

“… the greatest of these is love.”
— Jesus, 1st Corinthians 13:13

Just yesterday I was kicking around this notion that I had heard or read during my own spiritual Chautauqua, perhaps in conjunction with reading James Redfield’s, The Celestine Prophecy. [There was a passage where the main character projects his whole inner body core of positive energy toward a plant, or maybe a tree, resulting in a reciprocal receipt of the plant’s life energy into him. That is the meaning of love I’m using for this column, and what I believe Jesus is referring to in the Biblical passage I remember from my Lutheran upbringing. ]

As one who has been embarked for years now, 60+, with some major detours, on causes of one high kind or another, I can tell you it’s easy to fall into the trap of reactive mind —IOW just putting your heart on the shelf and cranking out concepts and judgments that you continually try to tie together in a logical, idealistic manner. Sadly, I’m only just learning my way out of such mental snares, which often render one’s words, however logically sound, bereft of feeling to one’s audience. [And then I wonder why so few really care what I have to say. It’s a common affliction in the truth, justice, and liberty movement.]

A Specific

Perhaps a week ago, seeking a way to popularize several of the salutary ideas presented in my novel, The Truman Prophecy (2016)—and in other immediate causes where the truth warriors are stymied—I delved into Twitter in more depth to see if it could be deployed as a tool to penetrate Good Big Ideas (GBIs) as memes through what I have called the “Barrier Cloud” of the Men of the Power Sickness. [The Barrier Cloud is a concept I created in my first major prescriptive cause-based book, The Sacred Nonaggression Principle. It refers to a sociobiological mind-control network that impedes the progress of humanity toward a society based on the nonaggression principle.] Continue reading

Brian’s Column: Comforting the Sick

… or the temporarily out of commission
(initially posted 8/15/11)

Providence Park HospitalIt occurred to me the other day, after visiting a neighbor who is hospitalized, that I may have acquired a certain penchant for this sort of modest gesture. Many seem to consider a willingness to visit the sick—especially those who are not good friends or kin—a hallmark of sensitivity. Reading the Bible, Matthew 25:36, Jesus says, “Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me.” Which I remember from Sunday School many years ago. Well, I don’t consider myself overly sentimental, but looking out for others does bring a profound (even selfish) satisfaction. Continue reading